Data Foundry Blog

Designing a Data Center for Security & Convenience

data center design

Purpose-built data centers, also sometimes referred to as greenfield data centers, are designed to protect IT infrastructure and keep it running 24x7x365. Because these data centers are designed with IT in mind long before construction begins, they provide greater redundancy and resiliency than retrofitted facilities. However, these aren’t the only advantages to purpose-built data centers. In addition to these benefits, they provide a higher level of security and convenience. When tenants are moving and installing servers that cost around $2000-$4000 each, it’s prudent for data center operators to ensure that these processes are as convenient and secure as possible. Operators who design their facilities from the ground up have the most control over this optimization.

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Is Colocation the Right Choice for Bitcoin Mining?

bitcoin mining in a colocation data center

So, you’ve had some success profitably mining bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies. You’ve continued to expand your operations, and now you’re looking for a space that can offer you all the power and cooling you need as you continue to expand. What could be better than renting space in a data center for bitcoin mining? As it turns out, not all data centers are created equal, and colocation isn’t the optimal solution for many bitcoin miners. Here’s why:

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What Your CFO Wants to Know about Colocation

CFO walking tight rope between servers

So, your company is considering colocation as a viable IT infrastructure strategy. How do you convince your CFO that it’s the right move? Convincing your CFO revolves around risk aversion and cost management. To help your CFO see the benefits of your decision, address the opportunity cost of the other options you’ve evaluated, discuss capital expenditure (CapEx) versus operational expenditure (OpEx), and address how colocation minimizes risk and cost to your organization.

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What’s Better than a Fault-Tolerant Data Center?

Achieving High Data Center Availability through Fault Avoidance

data center systems monitoring

A tier four data center is often described as fault-tolerant. To be fault-tolerant, a data center must have two parallel power and cooling systems with no single point of failure (also known as 2N). Building or co-locating in a tier four center is hardly cost-effective for most companies, and the jump from tier three to tier four provides a marginal gain in availability. However, infrastructure isn’t the only factor that plays into availability, and all data center owners/operators can see an improvement in uptime by going a step beyond fault tolerance and practicing “fault avoidance.” Without fault avoidance, tier numbers mean little in terms of availability.

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The Results Are In: 9 IT & Infrastructure Trends for 2018

Predictions for IT trends in 2018 are in, and results from forward-looking industry studies from IDC, Gartner, 451 Research and others are centered around the demands of digital business. Consumers demand speed, flexibility and a straightforward user experience that yields immediate results, or else. The competition is just a few clicks away. Consumer demands have led to the rise of the cloud, and now the edge. “The continuing digital business evolution exploits new digital models to align more closely the physical and digital worlds for employees, partners and customers,” says David Cearley, a fellow and vice president at Gartner. Here’s what these demands mean for IT in 2018:

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2017: A Year in Review

This year we continued to experience growth in the Austin and Houston markets, and our newest data center, Texas 2, will be completed just in time to meet demand. Data Foundry continues to evolve as a colocation provider, expanding our portfolio of managed services and connectivity services in an effort to help our customers reach their business goals through IT strategies. We also faced an unexpected challenge this year as Hurricane Harvey lingered over Houston for three long days before slowly moving on its way.

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What Does It Mean to Commission a Data Center?

5 Levels of Commissioning

Data center commissioning is a meticulous process that is crucial to ensuring the quality and reliability of a new data center. Because commissioning is often announced just before a new data center opens, some may think it is quick and only done once construction has finished. While the final stage of commissioning is conducted after the completion of construction, the reality is the commissioning process can be iterative and starts months before completion.

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4 Things Your Board Wants to Know About Colocation

board of directors chalkboard

If your decision to go with a colocation provider comes down to a board review, it’s important to understand their concerns before narrowing your list down to a couple of finalists. Convincing the board of directors revolves around four important factors: maximum risk aversion, continuous compliance, economic advantages and corporate responsibility.

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7 Steps You Shouldn’t Skip When Evaluating Colocation Providers

servers in colocation data center

Choosing a colocation provider is often a long and grueling process that should involve not only the IT department, but also cybersecurity, finance, executives, and the facilities team, if the company has one. Every team that will be affected by a company’s data center decision should have a say in the process. This will result in the best decision in the long run. Once a company closes a contract with a data center provider, they are often committed to three to five years. Here are seven key steps in selecting the right colocation provider for your business derived from Gartner’s framework.

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Millennials Change the Meaning of Mission Critical

millennials using devices

If you are a Millennial (born between approximately 1980 and 2000), or if you have children who are Millennials and younger, you know that a vote between the Internet, running water and electricity would be no contest. According to the Huffington Post, young people would choose an Internet connection over daylight and hot water. The authors of Gen Z @ Work found that 40% of young people in this age group would choose Wi-Fi over working bathrooms. In addition to being the utility of choice, the Internet is quickly becoming the primary communication medium during and after natural disasters. Of course, we understand we couldn’t access the Internet without power, but this shift is something to think about when data center operators consider the meaning of “mission critical” for future generations.

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